A True Hunter and Angler Stands Up for What’s Right

Take the Pledge

Take the Wyoming Hunters and Anglers Pledge

As a Hunter and Angler in the great state of Wyoming, I pledge the following:

Stand up for public lands and keep them in public hands

Support candidates who say no to the public lands seizure movement

Ensure every Wyomingite, and every American has the right to enter freely upon Wyoming’s public lands and work to increase access for sportsmen and women

Take the Pledge

Our Issues

Take Action

It’s no longer enough for corporations to exploit our public lands; now they want to own them. Join us in the fight to keep public lands public, ensure they are well-managed to support wildlife needs, and protect access for everyone. Tell us how you’d best like to make your voice heard by our elected officials, and don’t forget to sign the WYHAA pledge to keep public lands in public hands.

Volunteer

Help us Get Out the Vote for Sportsmen

Sign up here to help elect candidates who will fight for public lands. Volunteer for our phone bank effort to ensure sportsmen vote on Nov 8th for candidates who will keep public lands open.

Volunteer
Donate Now

Hold Elected Officials Accountable

WYHAA is launching an unprecedented voter education program to educate voters about the records and positions of WY legislative candidates in key races. Chip in to help pay for mailings and social media ads to educate sportsmen across the state. Donate Now

The WYHAA Board

Joe Riis
Joe RiisBoard Member
Joe Riis is a wildlife photojournalist known for his long-term work on Wyoming’s migrations. He is a National Geographic Magazine contributing photographer and Expeditions Council grantee, his work for NG has exposed him to wildlife issues on five continents ranging from tigers to amphibians. Joe received a degree in Wildlife Management from the University of Wyoming in 2008.

He received an Emmy Award in 2011 for his work on pronghorn migration in the Great Migrations TV series, the Stanford Knight-Riser Award for western environmental journalism with Emilene Ostlind in 2012, and the first Camp Monaco Prize with Arthur Middleton in 2013 for their project on Greater Yellowstone elk migrations. Joe’s hobbies include river rafting, bait-fishing for walleyes, fly-fishing for cutts, and hunting deer and elk for red meat. He lives in a cabin he built on the site of his great grandparents homestead in rural South Dakota when he isn’t chasing elk across Wyoming’s wilderness.

Ashley Genoff
Ashley GenoffBoard Member
Ashley Genoff is a lifelong Wyoming hunter and angler. Her family has lived in Wyoming for generations partly because of their love for the vast wilderness available for recreational use.

Ashley believes the Wyoming wilderness is well taken care of because Wyoming sportsmen and women, like herself, go out of their way to maintain the natural beauty of the land and leave no footprint behind. She said this is one of the state’s greatest attributes.

“Being alone in nature is the most spiritual, religious experience one can have in my opinion, and each hunt I go on makes me feel a little closer with our beautiful earth and the fantastic creatures I am lucky enough to interact with.”

Max Ludington
Max LudingtonVolunteer Chair
Max Ludington is an avid hunter and angler who lives in Jackson, WY. Born and raised on the east coast, Max picked up a fishing rod about as soon as he could walk. He moved to Wyoming as soon as he could and has been hunting and fishing in all of his spare time ever since. Don’t bother trying to get a hold of him on opening day.

Being outdoors and hunting and fishing on public lands is what Max loves most about Wyoming. He is passionate about protecting Wyoming’s heritage and ensuring his daughter gets to enjoy the same fishing and hunting opportunities he does.

Max works on land conservation projects around the American West with LegacyWorks Group. He holds a Masters in Environmental Science and Management and a Bachelors in History and Religious Studies.

Email Max at Ludington@wyominghuntersandanglers.org

About Us

During the summer of 2015, a small group of young hunters and anglers gathered together to discuss their concerns about a growing movement to privatize public lands that was taking place in the neighboring state of Utah. The group saw this movement as a serious threat to an individual’s rights to hunt and fish, but no sportsmen’s groups in Wyoming appeared to be taking action to defend public lands. The group also expressed concern regarding the impact on Wyoming’s unique migratory herds; in the group’s opinion, more dollars should be spent on wildlife research and habitat improvement. Furthermore, the group wanted better education programs in place to recruit more of their peers. Thus, the “Wyoming Hunters and Anglers Alliance” (WYHAA) was born.

WYHAA’s board is composed of young sportsmen and women who believe that the best way to guarantee the same hunting and fishing opportunities for current and future generations is to hold elected officials accountable for their actions. “Mule deer and antelope have declined significantly since my dad was my age,” said Matt Shaffer. “For too long, wildlife has been taken for granted here in Wyoming.”

Wyoming Hunters and Anglers Alliance promotes the conservation of Wyoming’s wildlife, the protection of sportsmen’s access, and the defense of public lands that belong to everyone.