2018 WYHAA CANDIDATE QUESTIONNAIRE

CANDIDATE RESPONSES

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State House

DAN KIRKBRIDE

HOUSE DISTRICT 04

EMAIL: danleydoright@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“I know sportsmen see red when this issue comes up. I can never quite understand that because most of the supporters of this action in the legislature are avid sportsmen and hunters, too, and they put language in the bill we reviewed to limit selloffs. So I’m supportive of the concept as it would help us better control our own destiny in managing our government lands, but it would only work if we could afford it. I’m not confident that we could nor would I expect that the federal government would gladly hand back the mineral rights which might make it work. Therefore, I see the chances of a takeback as minimal at best.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“I’d consider developing water storage a worthy undertaking, but in times of financial stress the benefits may not justify the costs. If as you say, the project only benefits a few, that makes it less justifiable.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I would definitely want migration patterns considered as part of project planning. I consider those roaming herds one of Wyoming’s great treasures.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“I see your point, and I do see that all citizens have a stake in wildlife welfare. I know there has been a move in recent funding decisions to try to make the WG&FD more self-sufficient. I think the thought is this department has a better avenue available to support itself than do most other agencies. That direction has largely come from the JAC, but I have not tried to override it.”

SHELLY DUNCAN

HOUSE DISTRICT 05

EMAIL: duncanhousedist5@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“I currently don’t have enough information to make an informed decision. I’m not in favor of the sale of public lands.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Water is the lifeblood of any community across our state as well as one of our greatest resources. I would have to see the facts and both sides in order to make an informed decision on whether I could support or deny.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I believe both parties should and could come to the table for dialogue. The Energy sector and the wildlife need to compromise and look for solutions that work for both parties given the available technology today.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I’m not informed enough about the issue. I would like to first see the spending and budget prior to making a position. I’m a supporter of Hunting and Angling across the state and strong supporter of public lands however, I’m not informed enough about the issues to take a stance either way.”

SUE WILSON

HOUSE DISTRICT 07

EMAIL: sue@wilsonwyominghouse7.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I would oppose transfer of military bases and national parks/monuments. I would not necessarily be opposed to considering some transfer of BLM/Forest Service lands, philosophically, but I recognize that would require funding and employees that we don’t have, so I would not vote for any transfers any time soon. Also I would oppose the sale of any federal lands transferred to the state.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I support water storage and conservation, but the West Battle Reservoir project had particular challenges that prevented it from being at the top of my list for funding.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I strongly support maintenance and improvement of habitat. I welcome the participation of the energy sector, but G&F should take the lead with their knowledge of habitat management.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I agree that all residents have an interest in funding G&F, and I support programs for nongame animals but, serving on Appropriations as I do, I realize that the state is short of revenue and cannot return to general funding of G&F at this time. ”

JOHN LYTTLE

HOUSE DISTRICT 07

EMAIL: johnlyttle1@aol.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“The transfer of federal lands is a cost that we should not take on. I agree with the results of the study.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

” I am a supporter of what the research is stating. The cost-benefit analysis makes sense to me.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“We are blessed in Wyoming to have the wildlife we have. We have a duty to protect it.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Recreation including hunting and fishing are major drivers of our quality of life and contributes to our economy. I have no doubt that money invested will come back to us.”

JENEFER PASQUA

HOUSE DISTRICT 10

EMAIL: Pasqua4House@yahoo.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I am fearful that the state would sale land in an attempt to make money.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“i appreciate the approach for developing the 10 in 10 initiative, but the financial burden appears to be too great for our state. ”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“The current process may/may not be working. It may be necessary to develop a new process for getting all the voices in the room.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Tourism is our state’s #2 economic resource. Without hunting, angling and wildlife viewing tourism would suffer. Wyoming would suffer. ”

CALOB TAYLOR

HOUSE DISTRICT 11

EMAIL: calobtaylor@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Public land needs to remain in public hands. Plain and simple we will lose access to these lands. Wyoming has already sold off a substantial amount of state trust land. With a tight budget would likely sell more if given the opportunity.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I am unfamiliar with the details of this issue and need to learn more. If you have additional information I could use to inform myself I would be grateful.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“In order to maintain a healthy population of game we need to have a balance on this issue.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“We need to look at ways to ensure there are funds to support thus department.”

RYAN LINDSEY

HOUSE DISTRICT 12

EMAIL: ryanforwyoming@yahoo.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I strongly support keeping public lands in public hands, and will gladly sponsor and help pass legislation to make this a permanent fixture in Wyoming policy.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I need to learn a lot more about this, but it seems that the current storage model is not working and needs to be updated.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Protection of our environment and wildlife must always come before the interests of short term gains. Wyoming stands as an example of this and we must continue to do so.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Wyoming cannot afford to allow its wildlife populations to dwindle. As you stated, many people come from all over the world to view our majestic creatures. The state legislature must ensure proper funding and I will support measures to do so.”

CATHERINE CONNOLLY

HOUSE DISTRICT 13

EMAIL: crc1321@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Our federal lands within the state are a national treasure. Control of those lands belong with the federal not state government to assure proper and management and control.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Careful consideration of the state need for dams is important, however protecting our aquifers must also be considered.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Wyoming’s game and fish, as well as wildlife scientists, should have an active role in such decisions. ”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I have supported and will continue to support Wyoming game and fish funding, especially for wildlife management.”

LORRAINE SAULINO-KLEIN

HOUSE DISTRICT 14

EMAIL: lsaulinoklein@hotmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“If WY takes over public lands they will be sold in times of economic down turns. I think this is a very bad idea if we want to be able to hike, fish and those who hunt with camera or gun would be left out of using our public lands.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I would like more information about this. However, based on your information I see that spending tax payer money for a limited few is not a good use of our resources and again it might cut some people out of water usage.

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“We need to protect animals and our beautiful landscapes. I do not trust the current administration to protect any animals or landscapes.

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Our quality of life depends on our tourism and recreation. We need to put our focus our money on our best interests.

MIKE YIN

HOUSE DISTRICT 16

EMAIL: mikeyin@electmikeyin.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“The state can’t afford to manage it, and the risk of any transferred lands being used for short term extraction revenue would be high. Something like the current WPLI process (or something similar) to handle any management concerns is useful instead.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Water rights are extremely complicated issues, especially when it comes to water that flows between states. I lean on the side of not building new dams, unless a strong case can be made for each individual dam that benefits all of Wyoming.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Protecting ecosystems is our responsibility. When the motive is profit, wildlife will suffer as a negative externality, unless regulation is in place to prevent it.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Both licenses and general fund should contribute. Managing our wildlife successfully is crucial for the long term stability of our ecosystems, that we all enjoy (as well as attract tourism). I think we will need some new options for revenue that addresses these concerns that can be dedicated toward wildlife management.”

TRACI CIEPIELA

HOUSE DISTRICT 17

EMAIL: tciepiela723@yahoo.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I don’t really know enough about the issue although the costs of fighting fires and maintaining the land could be cost prohibitive.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“We definitely should avoid other states taking our water but to spend millions for little gain is not cost effective”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Animals can adapt although that doesn’t mean we should intentionally inhibit their ability to move about.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I know there are a lot of people who are upset with the way the tags are drawn and given out. If someone is coming in from out of the state that should necessitate a higher priced tag. People who live here seem to lose out to outfitters bringing people from out of the state to hunt here. If someone from out of the state can afford to hunt here, they should be able to afford to help in the financing of wildlife management.”

JIM ROSCOE

HOUSE DISTRICT 22

EMAIL: jim@roscoeco.com

 

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“It is my main issue that I’m campaigning on. I’m an avid hunter,,and fisherman. I’m also on the advisory board of the local land trust & when I served in the Wy House previously I was on the wild life trust funding committee.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Each project needs to be looked at.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“G&F need to work w industry to protect these routes. I have a ranch on the mule deer migration.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“G&F have some major hurdles with disease , feed grounds , ect”

JUSTIN WINNEY

HOUSE DISTRICT 22

EMAIL: bill.winney@hotmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“Your point about revenues is appropriate, Wyoming must be able to manage these lands. I believe Wy G&F has done a credible job on the lands and wildlife it currently manages. That must continue to the benefit of Hunters & Anglers.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Proper water management is important for Wyoming. We are in danger of losing unused water to the Colorado River Compact. It must be done properly and efficiently to benefit the most people.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Wyoming can manage this. Wy G&F knows how to do that to the benefit of all concerned. A laissez faire approach does not benefit all concerned.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“We all benefit, to include the Tourist Industry (ie not just hunters & anglers). The totality of Wyoming’s game supports more than just those animals that are hunted. Wyoming must manage this aspect of its beauty to continue to attract these revenues.”

DENISE SHIRLEY

HOUSE DISTRICT 24

EMAIL: stayinbusy@yahoo.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“”I have been asking a lot of questions about this, and believe that the cost associated with this would burden the state even more than we already are burdened. If Wyoming took over the lands, I would fight hard to to have legislation passed to protect those lands for the people of Wyoming, so that they could never be sold off to the highest bidder. I have lived in Texas where the citizens had to pay a Deer lease fee just to go hunting. I think this is completely wrong and that the people of Wyoming should always have access to go hunting and use their lands. Wyoming lands belong to the people period and should never be sold for a profit.””

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I think it is important to conserve water whenever we can, however, I do not believe it is every tax payer obligation to pay for a few irrigation issues.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I live in Wapiti on Green Creek Road the road which leads to Table Top Mountain. I love the wild life that passes through our property during migration. I believe we need to protect the animals from any major disruption to their environments. I think working with Fish and Game is vital in maintaining the environment. We need to make sure the gas and oil companies leave very little foot print wherever they drill and extract. I think working together is the key in anything we do.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I think this is an important issue. We need to protect our wildlife, so they do not go extincted. I know our state is in a Budget crisis, and I think we need to see where there is wasteful spending. We need to take care of our people and animals and live within our means. Hunting is a vital part of the Wyoming life style and many family depend on hunting to feed their families. We need to work together to preserve all we have.”

RICHARD JONES

HOUSE DISTRICT 24

EMAIL: richardjoneshouse24@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“It’s complicated. Good management is good management. Nothing says the state would do a better job but the main issue I see is “one size fits all” decisions from the Feds. There needs to be more collaboration between the state and feds. I’m a big supporter of our Wy G&F agency. ”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Wy is unique in it’s constitutional water rights control. It’s a big but misunderstood and under reported issue. Tax dollars that subsidize a few can be problematic. It’s an issue I’m interested in. We need a Governor that understands this.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“My District 24, the North and South Forks of the Shoshoni, the Wapiti Valley and the northern half of Yellowstone are in my district. I live 20 miles outside of YNP. I’m confident that Wy G&F can work to preserve a reasonable balance of interests. Wildlife can be highly adaptable if given a chance.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Wildlife is one of our greatest resources and is important beyond our state.It’s not just about hunting.”

SANDY NEWSOME

HOUSE DISTRICT 24

EMAIL: newsomeinvestments@yahoo.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Federally owned public land would be at risk of being sold if it were in state control”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Water is an important issue in Wyoming. I am learning more about it daily.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“It is important to maintain migration paths. I support using the expertise of Game and Fish to maintain access to migration paths for game and non game animals.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Many tourist list wildlife watching as an activity that they enjoy. We can’t tax people to watch the wildlife, but we can support the management of this resource from in part from the general fund.”

JAMIE FLITNER

HOUSE DISTRICT 26

EMAIL: jmflitner@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“We personally deal with the BLM and USDA FS. The State could do a far better, and more rational job of managing lands within their borders but I don’t see this going anywhere, personally.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Water is Wyoming’s most precious resource. It is only going to get more scarce. It’s vital for livestock, wildlife and human beings. We need to safe guard and enhance Wyoming water.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Wildlife adapt. We need revenue from mineral production. The state and private energy companies can work together to protect corridors.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

“I think WY hunters and anglers have a sweet deal and should pay more for the management of these precious species especially since they are so vital to our economy. ”

HOWIE SAMELSON

HOUSE DISTRICT 28

EMAIL: info@howieforthehouse.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Keeping public lands available to everyone is paramount.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“We live in a region with limited water resources and proper conservation is important to me.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Experts with no vested interest is the only way to protect our wild resources.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have