2018 WYHAA CANDIDATE QUESTIONNAIRE

CANDIDATE RESPONSES

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State House

DAN KIRKBRIDE

HOUSE DISTRICT 04

EMAIL: danleydoright@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“I know sportsmen see red when this issue comes up. I can never quite understand that because most of the supporters of this action in the legislature are avid sportsmen and hunters, too, and they put language in the bill we reviewed to limit selloffs. So I’m supportive of the concept as it would help us better control our own destiny in managing our government lands, but it would only work if we could afford it. I’m not confident that we could nor would I expect that the federal government would gladly hand back the mineral rights which might make it work. Therefore, I see the chances of a takeback as minimal at best.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“I’d consider developing water storage a worthy undertaking, but in times of financial stress the benefits may not justify the costs. If as you say, the project only benefits a few, that makes it less justifiable.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I would definitely want migration patterns considered as part of project planning. I consider those roaming herds one of Wyoming’s great treasures.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“I see your point, and I do see that all citizens have a stake in wildlife welfare. I know there has been a move in recent funding decisions to try to make the WG&FD more self-sufficient. I think the thought is this department has a better avenue available to support itself than do most other agencies. That direction has largely come from the JAC, but I have not tried to override it.”

SHELLY DUNCAN

HOUSE DISTRICT 05

EMAIL: duncanhousedist5@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“I currently don’t have enough information to make an informed decision. I’m not in favor of the sale of public lands.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Water is the lifeblood of any community across our state as well as one of our greatest resources. I would have to see the facts and both sides in order to make an informed decision on whether I could support or deny.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I believe both parties should and could come to the table for dialogue. The Energy sector and the wildlife need to compromise and look for solutions that work for both parties given the available technology today.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I’m not informed enough about the issue. I would like to first see the spending and budget prior to making a position. I’m a supporter of Hunting and Angling across the state and strong supporter of public lands however, I’m not informed enough about the issues to take a stance either way.”

SUE WILSON

HOUSE DISTRICT 07

EMAIL: sue@wilsonwyominghouse7.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I would oppose transfer of military bases and national parks/monuments. I would not necessarily be opposed to considering some transfer of BLM/Forest Service lands, philosophically, but I recognize that would require funding and employees that we don’t have, so I would not vote for any transfers any time soon. Also I would oppose the sale of any federal lands transferred to the state.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I support water storage and conservation, but the West Battle Reservoir project had particular challenges that prevented it from being at the top of my list for funding.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I strongly support maintenance and improvement of habitat. I welcome the participation of the energy sector, but G&F should take the lead with their knowledge of habitat management.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I agree that all residents have an interest in funding G&F, and I support programs for nongame animals but, serving on Appropriations as I do, I realize that the state is short of revenue and cannot return to general funding of G&F at this time. ”

JOHN LYTTLE

HOUSE DISTRICT 07

EMAIL: johnlyttle1@aol.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“The transfer of federal lands is a cost that we should not take on. I agree with the results of the study.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

” I am a supporter of what the research is stating. The cost-benefit analysis makes sense to me.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“We are blessed in Wyoming to have the wildlife we have. We have a duty to protect it.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Recreation including hunting and fishing are major drivers of our quality of life and contributes to our economy. I have no doubt that money invested will come back to us.”

JENEFER PASQUA

HOUSE DISTRICT 10

EMAIL: Pasqua4House@yahoo.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I am fearful that the state would sale land in an attempt to make money.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“i appreciate the approach for developing the 10 in 10 initiative, but the financial burden appears to be too great for our state. ”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“The current process may/may not be working. It may be necessary to develop a new process for getting all the voices in the room.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Tourism is our state’s #2 economic resource. Without hunting, angling and wildlife viewing tourism would suffer. Wyoming would suffer. ”

CALOB TAYLOR

HOUSE DISTRICT 11

EMAIL: calobtaylor@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Public land needs to remain in public hands. Plain and simple we will lose access to these lands. Wyoming has already sold off a substantial amount of state trust land. With a tight budget would likely sell more if given the opportunity.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I am unfamiliar with the details of this issue and need to learn more. If you have additional information I could use to inform myself I would be grateful.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“In order to maintain a healthy population of game we need to have a balance on this issue.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“We need to look at ways to ensure there are funds to support thus department.”

RYAN LINDSEY

HOUSE DISTRICT 12

EMAIL: ryanforwyoming@yahoo.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I strongly support keeping public lands in public hands, and will gladly sponsor and help pass legislation to make this a permanent fixture in Wyoming policy.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I need to learn a lot more about this, but it seems that the current storage model is not working and needs to be updated.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Protection of our environment and wildlife must always come before the interests of short term gains. Wyoming stands as an example of this and we must continue to do so.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Wyoming cannot afford to allow its wildlife populations to dwindle. As you stated, many people come from all over the world to view our majestic creatures. The state legislature must ensure proper funding and I will support measures to do so.”

CATHERINE CONNOLLY

HOUSE DISTRICT 13

EMAIL: crc1321@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Our federal lands within the state are a national treasure. Control of those lands belong with the federal not state government to assure proper and management and control.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Careful consideration of the state need for dams is important, however protecting our aquifers must also be considered.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Wyoming’s game and fish, as well as wildlife scientists, should have an active role in such decisions. ”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I have supported and will continue to support Wyoming game and fish funding, especially for wildlife management.”

LORRAINE SAULINO-KLEIN

HOUSE DISTRICT 14

EMAIL: lsaulinoklein@hotmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“If WY takes over public lands they will be sold in times of economic down turns. I think this is a very bad idea if we want to be able to hike, fish and those who hunt with camera or gun would be left out of using our public lands.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I would like more information about this. However, based on your information I see that spending tax payer money for a limited few is not a good use of our resources and again it might cut some people out of water usage.

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“We need to protect animals and our beautiful landscapes. I do not trust the current administration to protect any animals or landscapes.

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Our quality of life depends on our tourism and recreation. We need to put our focus our money on our best interests.

MIKE YIN

HOUSE DISTRICT 16

EMAIL: mikeyin@electmikeyin.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“The state can’t afford to manage it, and the risk of any transferred lands being used for short term extraction revenue would be high. Something like the current WPLI process (or something similar) to handle any management concerns is useful instead.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Water rights are extremely complicated issues, especially when it comes to water that flows between states. I lean on the side of not building new dams, unless a strong case can be made for each individual dam that benefits all of Wyoming.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Protecting ecosystems is our responsibility. When the motive is profit, wildlife will suffer as a negative externality, unless regulation is in place to prevent it.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Both licenses and general fund should contribute. Managing our wildlife successfully is crucial for the long term stability of our ecosystems, that we all enjoy (as well as attract tourism). I think we will need some new options for revenue that addresses these concerns that can be dedicated toward wildlife management.”

TRACI CIEPIELA

HOUSE DISTRICT 17

EMAIL: tciepiela723@yahoo.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I don’t really know enough about the issue although the costs of fighting fires and maintaining the land could be cost prohibitive.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“We definitely should avoid other states taking our water but to spend millions for little gain is not cost effective”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Animals can adapt although that doesn’t mean we should intentionally inhibit their ability to move about.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I know there are a lot of people who are upset with the way the tags are drawn and given out. If someone is coming in from out of the state that should necessitate a higher priced tag. People who live here seem to lose out to outfitters bringing people from out of the state to hunt here. If someone from out of the state can afford to hunt here, they should be able to afford to help in the financing of wildlife management.”

JIM ROSCOE

HOUSE DISTRICT 22

EMAIL: jim@roscoeco.com

 

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“It is my main issue that I’m campaigning on. I’m an avid hunter,,and fisherman. I’m also on the advisory board of the local land trust & when I served in the Wy House previously I was on the wild life trust funding committee.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Each project needs to be looked at.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“G&F need to work w industry to protect these routes. I have a ranch on the mule deer migration.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“G&F have some major hurdles with disease , feed grounds , ect”

JUSTIN WINNEY

HOUSE DISTRICT 22

EMAIL: bill.winney@hotmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“Your point about revenues is appropriate, Wyoming must be able to manage these lands. I believe Wy G&F has done a credible job on the lands and wildlife it currently manages. That must continue to the benefit of Hunters & Anglers.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Proper water management is important for Wyoming. We are in danger of losing unused water to the Colorado River Compact. It must be done properly and efficiently to benefit the most people.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Wyoming can manage this. Wy G&F knows how to do that to the benefit of all concerned. A laissez faire approach does not benefit all concerned.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“We all benefit, to include the Tourist Industry (ie not just hunters & anglers). The totality of Wyoming’s game supports more than just those animals that are hunted. Wyoming must manage this aspect of its beauty to continue to attract these revenues.”

DENISE SHIRLEY

HOUSE DISTRICT 24

EMAIL: stayinbusy@yahoo.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“”I have been asking a lot of questions about this, and believe that the cost associated with this would burden the state even more than we already are burdened. If Wyoming took over the lands, I would fight hard to to have legislation passed to protect those lands for the people of Wyoming, so that they could never be sold off to the highest bidder. I have lived in Texas where the citizens had to pay a Deer lease fee just to go hunting. I think this is completely wrong and that the people of Wyoming should always have access to go hunting and use their lands. Wyoming lands belong to the people period and should never be sold for a profit.””

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I think it is important to conserve water whenever we can, however, I do not believe it is every tax payer obligation to pay for a few irrigation issues.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I live in Wapiti on Green Creek Road the road which leads to Table Top Mountain. I love the wild life that passes through our property during migration. I believe we need to protect the animals from any major disruption to their environments. I think working with Fish and Game is vital in maintaining the environment. We need to make sure the gas and oil companies leave very little foot print wherever they drill and extract. I think working together is the key in anything we do.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I think this is an important issue. We need to protect our wildlife, so they do not go extincted. I know our state is in a Budget crisis, and I think we need to see where there is wasteful spending. We need to take care of our people and animals and live within our means. Hunting is a vital part of the Wyoming life style and many family depend on hunting to feed their families. We need to work together to preserve all we have.”

RICHARD JONES

HOUSE DISTRICT 24

EMAIL: richardjoneshouse24@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“It’s complicated. Good management is good management. Nothing says the state would do a better job but the main issue I see is “one size fits all” decisions from the Feds. There needs to be more collaboration between the state and feds. I’m a big supporter of our Wy G&F agency. ”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Wy is unique in it’s constitutional water rights control. It’s a big but misunderstood and under reported issue. Tax dollars that subsidize a few can be problematic. It’s an issue I’m interested in. We need a Governor that understands this.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“My District 24, the North and South Forks of the Shoshoni, the Wapiti Valley and the northern half of Yellowstone are in my district. I live 20 miles outside of YNP. I’m confident that Wy G&F can work to preserve a reasonable balance of interests. Wildlife can be highly adaptable if given a chance.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Wildlife is one of our greatest resources and is important beyond our state.It’s not just about hunting.”

SANDY NEWSOME

HOUSE DISTRICT 24

EMAIL: newsomeinvestments@yahoo.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Federally owned public land would be at risk of being sold if it were in state control”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Water is an important issue in Wyoming. I am learning more about it daily.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“It is important to maintain migration paths. I support using the expertise of Game and Fish to maintain access to migration paths for game and non game animals.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Many tourist list wildlife watching as an activity that they enjoy. We can’t tax people to watch the wildlife, but we can support the management of this resource from in part from the general fund.”

JAMIE FLITNER

HOUSE DISTRICT 26

EMAIL: jmflitner@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“We personally deal with the BLM and USDA FS. The State could do a far better, and more rational job of managing lands within their borders but I don’t see this going anywhere, personally.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Water is Wyoming’s most precious resource. It is only going to get more scarce. It’s vital for livestock, wildlife and human beings. We need to safe guard and enhance Wyoming water.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Wildlife adapt. We need revenue from mineral production. The state and private energy companies can work together to protect corridors.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

“I think WY hunters and anglers have a sweet deal and should pay more for the management of these precious species especially since they are so vital to our economy. ”

HOWIE SAMELSON

HOUSE DISTRICT 28

EMAIL: info@howieforthehouse.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Keeping public lands available to everyone is paramount.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“We live in a region with limited water resources and proper conservation is important to me.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Experts with no vested interest is the only way to protect our wild resources.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Keeping general fund financing insures the proper management of our wildlife.”

GAIL SYMONS

HOUSE DISTRICT 30

EMAIL: gailsymons@mac.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Not only do we not have the resources to properly manage the lands, our constitution and statehood documents specifically exclude us from taking on federal lands.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I do not have enough background information on this topic to have a declared input. I do believe that we have substantially underwritten irrigation and water costs for select groups that has not benefited the population as a whole.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“There should always be a balance between economic and stewardship. There is no reason that collaborative efforts cannot successfully meet primary needs for leases and for migration corridors.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Wildlife is a significant part of our Tourism economy which benefits all residents of the state. I am certainly open to looking at ways to ensure funding available to maintain wildlife. As with any effort that requires money, I would expect to see measurable outcomes identified to evaluate the effectiveness.”

DAVE HARDESTY

HOUSE DISTRICT 31

EMAIL: davehardesty1@gmail.com

 

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“As a kid I remember riding in a 1975 Ford, bench seat truck, searching for antelope in the Bighorn Basin. If I didn’t watch out, my dad would bruise my kneecap everytime he shifted into reverse. Every hill crested came with great anticipation. One learns a lot on those trips sandwiched between hunting buddies; the banter, the camaraderie, the crude jokes. I felt like we could drive for days on two-track roads with sage growing in the middle. Little did I know then that we were driving on BLM land.

I feel right now there is an effort in our state to seize control over federally managed lands, transferring all rights and ownership to the state of Wyoming. I oppose this effort because it will eventually lead to reduced access and less public land. Total acres of federal land entrusted to the 48 contiguous states: 156 million. Acres of those public-trust lands that have been sold: 110 million, or 70% (Field and Stream, Apr. 2017) Short-sighted sales may produce money to cover a current bust cycle but those lands will be lost forever to the public. If you’re an outdoor enthusiast as I am, let’s preserve public land access for our children.

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I need to research this initiative more as it is a new one to me, possible because “no new project has been completed”. As a candidate for office I would like to hear more from your organization on this issue.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“As your organization pointed out in the beginning of this survey, wildlife provides a great economic benefit to Wyoming through tourism and hunting. Protecting this is very important to me as I am an avid outdoorsman. I believe our Wyoming Game and Fish does a fantastic job of researching and protecting this resource. I read Wyoming Wildlife regularly as it is a great source of information. A balance between energy extraction and wildlife is critical to maintain healthy breeding populations.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Hunters and anglers do provide the vast majority of funding for Game and Fish conservation efforts. I have always appreciated the efforts of our law enforcement and biologists, working in some of the toughest and most beautiful places in the state. It is amazing how much has been accomplished. As a legislator I would be open to any and all ideas put on the table to help our Game and Fish department. ”

TIMOTHY HALLINAN

HOUSE DISTRICT 32

EMAIL: tphallinan@bresnan.net

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“I don’t believe that a state takeover of some federal lands would be at a loss. I doubt that any of this will happen however.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“I don’t know the details on all of this. I would evaluate each on their merits.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“I support some activity by the fish and game in this issue.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I don’t believe that the state should necessarily be out of funding for these issues. I believe that we should address the issue depending on the need for involvement and the availability of funds.”

ART WASHUT

HOUSE DISTRICT 36

EMAIL: art.washutforhouse36@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I doubt the US government will ever allow this. If it is allowed I will fight to ensure that there are guarantees to preserve the multiple use of any lands that are placed under WY control. I also think that managing these lands could end up being more expensive than the returns, firefighting alone could be a huge expense. The state needs to fully evaluate the costs.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I will need more information. I think the details matter in this discussion. Some water projects may actually make sense but our money is very tight so the state must make prudent choices especially about expensive projects. Some water projects might also create fishing opportunities so I would like to evaluate these on a case-by-case basis and I don’t have those details at this point.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I think we have the capacity to develop our resources while we protect wildlife, I don’t think it has to be an either / or type proposition. The Game and Fish absolutely needs to have input in order to make certain that we find that proper balance. There are many sources of pressure on wildlife habitat including urban sprawl and development of previously undeveloped or agricultural lands that are privately owned. As Wyoming’s population grows there will be many people who want to live away from towns and cities and who can afford to do so. Land owners will be tempted to sell their rural land for new subdivisions and homesites. This is why we need to be very careful with our public lands and how they are managed or we will change the beauty and culture of this state forever. Perhaps these changes are inevitable, but I want to do what I can to keep Wyoming a wonderful place for my kids and grandkids.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“The general fund is already stretched and providing additional funding to agencies, even for well deserving programs and projects is going to be almost impossible at this time. I do, however, believe that wildlife plays a role in tourism and that wildlife is enjoyed by many non-hunters so it makes sense to me that the full cost of operating WYGFD operations not be placed on the hunters and anglers.”

DEBBIE BOVEE

HOUSE DISTRICT 36

EMAIL: debbiebovee@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“The public land concern is one of my main campaign issues for all of the reasons you stated above. According to most polls, the large majority of Wyoming citizens oppose the state taking control of federal lands. However, there are a number of political figures pushing for the take over. I believe that it is extremely important that citizens speak out and use their power of the vote.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I voted to strip the funding for the West Battlecreek project because it seemed clear that the benefits were not worth the cost. My score on the second question does not indicate my feeling of the importance of this issue. Rather, I don’t feel I have a strong enough understanding to sponsor a bill. I would happily co-sponsor a bill with someone more knowledgeable than myself.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Again, I would happily co-sponsor a bill. I could use more information and guidance to draft a bill myself.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I want the Game and Fish to have appropriate funding. There needs to be ways for the Game and Fish to generate funding for themselves and the general fund appropriations should fill the gap in funding.”

GREGORY FLESVIG

HOUSE DISTRICT 37

EMAIL: gregfl@bresnan.net

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“It is patently unconstitutional for the Federal government to own land outside of its original intent. Overreach is widespread- just ask Ammon Bundy.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Adding another body of water always seems like a good idea in a semi-arrid desert.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Excellent example how the people of Wyoming can better manage the land of the state; rather than the federal government. ”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“WYGAF would be an excellent candidate for a special use tax. Gasoline to ATV’s and boats pay a state road fuel tax on each gallon of gasoline. Why is that applied to the roads and not towards WYGAF? A use tax like that would be more appropriate. ”

STAN BLAKE

HOUSE DISTRICT 39

EMAIL: wyominman@msn.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Public lands are for everyone’s enjoyment. They should not be in control of those who would exploit them.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Some projects are great projects for many reasons. those that are not beneficial to more than several people should be reexamined.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Migration corridors are very important. I was prime sponsor of HB39, Wildlife Conservation License Plates to help protect humans and animals along these corridors to reduce incidents.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Wyoming Game and Fish need to be fully funded.”

CHRIS SCHOCK

HOUSE DISTRICT 40

EMAIL: chrisschock@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I would have to fully research both sides of the issue.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Water is an important issue to everyone in the State of Wyoming.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Energy and game population are very important to the State of Wyoming but also the United States.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“The budget is very tricky with a lot of different groups wanting a piece of the pie. Everything has to be considered for what is best for all in the State of Wyoming”

BILL HENDERSON

HOUSE DISTRICT 41

EMAIL: bill4wyo@gmail.com

 

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Responsible access to public lands, use of natural resources and conservation of habitat are critical priorities. Safeguarding public access, stewardship of resources and habitat, among other things, must be considered to determine sufficient necessity in analysis conducted by Office of State Lands and Investment (OSLI) to support the Board of Land Commissioners in responsible decision making on exchanges, or sale of state land, including exchange involving federal land. Careful economic analysis and adequate related study are needed for particular circumstances must be properly done (e.g., Bonander exchange) before final decision is made. Landlocked areas, incomplete analysis and limited input from stakeholders combine to impact access, resources and conservation factors. Our state struggles on funding now, for example, to pay state portions of wild fire expenses — public policy to acquire, control or take scalable responsibility to manage federal lands would likely exacerbate already limited funding. Study is ongoing by OSLI, among others, and Joint Agriculture Committee related to landlocked land parcels across the state. I am working with stakeholders on legislation to require our Board of Land Commissioners to conduct analysis of economic impact on public access in making a determination of sufficient necessity in exchange or sale of state land. Our last interim Joint Agriculture Committee meeting is scheduled for the end of September, 2018.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Water is a very important resource for our state, involving other beneficial purposes not just irrigation for agriculture (e.g., Colorado River Compact). Water rights are also important and must be considered when determining best interests. Water banking is being considered by the Select Water Committee and Joint Agriculture Committee. Water is a very important issue for our state, especially in Laramie County — where competing use occurs.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Protecting migration corridor is high priority. WG&F is a reliable voice in balancing energy development with migration and winter range. Energy companies are monitoring and take steps to address impact on wildlife (e.g., wind energy and wildlife, as well as restoration of surface land after coal mining. Continued monitoring and regulation is needed.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I’m open to a conversation about adequate funding support for WG&FD, including provisions for the source of funding.”

PAUL E. JOHNSON

HOUSE DISTRICT 44

EMAIL: paul@johnsonforwyoming.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I have concerns that transfer of federal public lands to the state would be cost prohibitive for us to manage well. The high cost of forest fire operations alone highlight my point.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I would not support water storage projects if they are not cost effective.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I think that developing our energy resources and protecting migration corridors do not necessarily need to be mutually exclusive. I would favor a streamlined process in which energy companies and Game and Fish are able to find a mutually agreeable solution to future energy development.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“I think that all residents do have an interest in wildlife management. Ideally, we would have enough money in the general fund to support this. Unfortunately, the economic reality is that budget cuts affected this along with other worthwhile programs. When our economy begins to grow again, I think we should take another look at restoring funding to wildlife management and other programs.”

CHARLES PELKEY

HOUSE DISTRICT 45

EMAIL: Charles@Pelkey.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I am fully committed to keeping public lands in PUBLIC hands!”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Each of these projects must be considered on their merits. I will oppose any project that doesn’t benefit the people of Wyoming, not just a small number of irrigators.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Wyoming wildlife is a rare treasure. Leaving it to people with profit motives would be an obscenity.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I would support GF allocations, but that would mean that a broader cross-section of the state providing input on the management of wildlife in the state, including seeing the value of non-consumptive uses.”

JACKIE GRIMES

HOUSE DISTRICT 46

EMAIL: jacqueline@electjackiegrimes.org

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“With the current financial climate being what it is in Wyoming with difficulty funding education and infrastructure adequately, I do not see a feasible solution to the state managing the public lands. I fear if this movement takes hold public lands, which are used for a variety of reasons including hunting, camping, and hiking, would result in the private selling of lands to generate funds for the state. These lands are a treasure that should be maintained and available for all, not just the few who can afford to purchase them.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“While we are facing significant droughts and water shortages across our nation, Wyoming has significant financial needs now that need to be resolved. There needs to be a thoughtful action that is both cost effective and efficient in securing water for future endeavors. However, it appears as the the significant amount in delay of implementing some efforts along with expensive methods of preserving water is resulting in an expensive waiting period.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Ultimately, Wyoming wildlife should take priority in many of these areas, especially when considering the industries that want to disrupt migration paths are dying energy industries. You did not include the development in wind energies, which I do believe need to be considered as well. This up and coming energy source, while very attractive, needs to be closely monitored for similar concerns as the wind noise and power impact the movement of the animals around it. I moved to Wyoming largely because of my love of the openness of the public lands and of the beauty in getting to quite literally see where the deer and antelope play. Our wildlife is a more enduring legacy than some of our energy legacies and needs to be honored.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Our nation is experiencing a purging of species from the threatened, endangered, and protected lists, largely because of personal opinions and not directed by data to support these decisions. We need to keep our ecosystem balanced and monitored as the loss of one species has a ripple effect that does demonstrate impact on residents, for example the shortage of bees. While I am unsure of what committees I would serve on in terms of generating legislation, and my primary expertise being in education, I would support legislation that appropriately funds our game and fish departments to allow them to be the experts they are. I strongly believe the government should defer to experts in their fields over political noise.”

WILLIAM HALEY

HOUSE DISTRICT 46

EMAIL: haleyforhouse@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I have never been in favor of transferring Federal Public land to the state. Instead, our congressmen should enact legislation that would force the USFS and BLM to include state partners as equals in managing and making decisions that affect of state’s natural resources. I worked for 40 years for the Wyoming Game and Fish department. The last 37 years as a game warden in Albany County. I worked with other GF employees to obtain private lands for the public to hunt and fish on through the Private Lands Public Wildlife Program. I also opposed the Bonander land exchange and submitted written comments to OSLI and all 5 elected officials who make up their board of directors. I recently wrote comments opposing the outright sale of a section of landlocked state land here in Albany County. My recommendation was to combine several landlocked state sections for a block of land with public access. The Albany County Commissioners appointed me to the funding oversight committee for the Pilot Hill Project which, if successful, allows for the purchase/trade of 5500 acres of private land for the public. This property connects Laramie to the National forest east of Laramie. ”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Water storage is very important for the state. It does more than provide water for a few irrigators. Please research the proposed water development plans for the state. There are many benefits besides irrigation; benefits for wildlife and recreation for example.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I was a wildlife manager for 37 years with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. I fully understand the importance of maintaining wildlife migration corridors. It is absolutely essential.I will support any effort to protect wildlife migration corridors.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“In 2017 legislation was passed stripping all general fund money from the Department. We were debating the bill which included a substantial license fee increase for non-residents but an extremely small resident fee increase. I drafted an amendment to that bill raising resident license fees slightly. My amendment generally raised resident license fees by three or four dollars each instead of the proposed one dollar per license increase. I did this because, during my career, I saw the advantages of small increases more frequently rather than waiting several years, then legislating one big license fee increase. Small increase are more palatable to sportsmen than large fee increases. I am in favor of General Fund monies supporting things like unfunded federally mandated management of protected species, capital construction projects and programs like the AIS program that protects Wyoming’s water.”

JULIE MCCALLISTER

HOUSE DISTRICT 47

EMAIL: juliemccallister47@hotmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Public lands is an area of extremely high concern for me, I would be happy to sponsor on this issue.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“This issue is complicated, I learn toward the sportsmans, and saving rvenenue, but I do see both sides of the argument.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“It is public land, the public use must come first.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I would start in budgeting transparency, and move forward from there.”

JERRY PAXTON

HOUSE DISTRICT 47

EMAIL: jpaxton@union-tel.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

“I see no benefit to the state from acquiring federally managed lands.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Water is the life blood of our arid state and must be protected at all cost but we must use caution to assure funds are expended in direct relationship to level of benefit to the largest number of citizens.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I believe there is an acceptable balance between energy production and protection of our wildlife resources. The mineral extraction industry is by far the largest generator of revenue for the state and should not be encumbered by onerous regulation but cannot be allowed to engage in activities that have long term detrimental impacts to our wildlife.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I am not convinced that sportsmen should bear the full cost of managing wildlife especially wolves, grizzly bears and endangered species that are listed or in danger of being listed.”

DAVID NORTHRUP

HOUSE DISTRICT 50

EMAIL: davidastridnorthrup@gmail.com

 

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I believe that if Wyoming was given the federal lands,we, the people of Wyoming should never allow a transfer or sale of these lands. To that extent, I believe that there should be a constitutional amendment that would plainly state this position and that the people of Wyoming should vote it into place.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“Wyoming allows water that is rightfully ours to leave the state without ever having been a beneficial use. Other states have noticed this and are looking at cross basin diversions to water the thirsty cities of the west. we, the people of Wyoming should at the least make use of the water for recreation, irrigation and power generation.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Corridors are being used now and if kept as is , the wild life will continue using them.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“The Obama administration has done more for the G&F than almost all of us put together. The Taxes on guns, ammunition have been very prosperous for the G&F.”

CYRUS WESTERN

HOUSE DISTRICT 51

EMAIL: cyrus@votewestern.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Keep public lands in public hands. This is what I’ve told people on the campaign trail and my votes will reflect this position. ”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I’d have to look at the language of any bill and assess the specific impacts. Serving my constituents is my No. 1 priority; that being said, I’d be happy to try and work with WYHAA to ensure high quality game and habitat for hunters for generations to come. ”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Considering I work for an oil & gas company, I deeply sympathize with the concerns of energy companies. However, I also greatly value high quality game and habitat. I firmly believe in multi-use land policy and believe that, in most cases, we can achieve outcomes that benefit all involved stakeholders.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I certainly concur that an adequately funded G&F Department is important to properly manage wildlife within the state. That being said, fiscal conservatism is one of the biggest platforms I’m running on and I’m hesitant to authorize funding increases given our current budget. In a perfect world, G&F would be well funded independent of the general fund, which would relieve them of cyclical budget constraints that Wyoming is susceptible to.”

WILLIAM ADSIT

HOUSE DISTRICT 51

EMAIL: bill.pluc@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Before accepting any lands we need to get rid of the regulations that require sale of any acreage over that owned in 1999. Otherwise we would have to sell what we received. Secondly, we need to better manage the land we have and insure that any sales or trades consider the recreational and game management costs. Our system of using out-of-state appraisers helps no one.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Water is one of our most important resources. I took middle ground in the above, because reservoirs provide habitat and fishing, but also benefit irrigators. If the funds are available, it should be done as a win, win, not all for one side. Once federal interests file on the water, we will have lost it, so it is important develop water and have it for our population when it is needed.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I received my first hunting license 60 years ago. I believe in game management and protection, but I also believe in property rights. I believe we can protect the migration routes and improve habitat with good management. We should identify the routes and prevent land development and housing in those areas. With horizontal drilling most of the wildlife impacts can be mitigated without totally blocking all energy development. With some common sense and good planning we can protect the corridors and still be able to afford the fuel for hunting and other recreation. ”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Right now there is little to no accountability for where the money is spent and we should examine whether the budget is being efficiently spent or if there possible savings there. I believe there should be a system for the people who enjoy the wildlife but do not hunt to share in the support of G&F management. I believe it is fair to expect people who use a resource to pay for managing it. Whether that should come from the general fund, or a use tax of some kind, I am not yet sure. Hunting and fishing license fees have about reached the price that causes fewer to purchase them so the increased funds have to come from other users.”

DANIEL SANDOVAL

HOUSE DISTRICT 57

EMAIL: daniel.sandoval3663@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I need to research whether legislation is necessary, but all efforts to privatize public lands should be resisted.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Water allocation law started in Wyoming, something I learned from Harriet Hageman. As precipitation becomes more unpredictable, water storage is going to be even more critical in the future.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I’ve seen the corridor outside Pinedale, WY, and it’s well designed. Companies and wildlife managers should work together and hopefully avoid the need for legislation.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Again, the need for legislation should be a high bar to clear, but funding to wildlife management must be stable for long-term planning.”

CHARLES SCHOENWOLF

HOUSE DISTRICT 58

EMAIL: charles@casperinhomecare.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I am against the transfer of Federal lands over to the State.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I need more information on the matter.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I am a sportsman and avid outdoorsman, these are important issues to me.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

“I don’t believe we should use the general fund for this.”

LAURIE LONGTINE

HOUSE DISTRICT 59

EMAIL: ledgerpluscasper@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Wyoming’s federal public lands are a vital part of our state economy. Public lands draw millions of visitors and their dollars to our state each year helping to support one of Wyoming’s largest economic sectors. Public lands also provide unparalleled recreational opportunities for Wyoming residents. Many of my fondest memories growing up in Wyoming are of Wyoming’s wild spaces.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Anchor Dam comes to mind whenever I hear about water storage projects in Wyoming. Wyoming’s storage projects often disregard engineering and hydrological advice while costing taxpayers. The time and expense of permitting and court battles is not justified when so few realize any benefits. Simple often inexpensive conservation efforts would confer more benefits at lower costs.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“The Wyoming Game and Fish Department bears the burden and associated costs of managing energy development impacts on game and non-game species. Therefore, WGFD should have a primary role in all aspects of development in migration corridors and other critical habitat.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I would support appropriations from the general fund for the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. General fund appropriations are subject to the political whims of any particular legislative session however. Because of this, I would like to see the sales tax collected on outdoor and sporting equipment be dedicated to funding the WGFD. Additionally, a portion of the revenue normally paid into the Permanent Mineral Trust Fund should be diverted to the WGFD. Personally, I encourage everyone to purchase a conservation stamp annually.”

State Senate

JUDITH MCCULLOUGH

SENATE DISTRICT 01

EMAIL: jmccullough@collinscom.net

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Technically, the land already belongs to the state. The federal government has been managing it since state hood when the state didn’t want to deal with it. Considering the damage the feds allow to the forests by letting environmentalists shut down the use of the resource timber which is resulting in catastrophic fires, I think the state would do better. The states wildlife would definitely do better if the state would stand up to the federal government on the endangered species act which gave us an over load of grizzlies and wolves. Wyoming needs to thank the Dept of Interior for their help and take over management. Wyoming will not be able to sell the land. All of it has some claims on it they will have to honor. Example: grazing allotments, water rights, and easements that are private property.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

“I prefer the state to give permits for individuals to build dams and other water storage. You are correct on the cost to taxpayers.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“This leads to the question, just how much power to we want to give WG&F? But at the same time to trust energy companies to do anything but extract oil, gas, coal is to give them too much credit. It should be state regulated. I am just not sure WG&F should do it. Wildlife is adaptable and if handled right and they get used to the oil pumps, they seem to ignore them. But while there is lots of human activity, they shy away from it. There is a way to do it, with proper oversight.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“First, I feel that hunters and fishermen who have to buy licenses and as you said are paying for of this, need relief. Hunters should not have to fund non game species. With all the money the environmentalists have, shouldn’t they fund the grizzlies and wolves who prey on the game animals? Wyoming taxpayers should not have to fund the costs of non game species.”

MARCELLA SHAVER

SENATE DISTRICT 03

EMAIL: marcish@aol.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Keeping public land accessible to the public is a major point of my platform. ”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I haven’t looked into the issue. ”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Wyoming’s wildlife is an important part of our economy and way of life. We have to make sure our grandchildren can enjoy it, too. ”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Since we all benefit from our wildlife, it is in our best interests to support it financially. ”

MARTIN GUBBELS

SENATE DISTRICT 03

EMAIL: gubbels.martin@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I think it is very important to put more grass and arid grassland out of the hands of federal government and in the hands of private landowners. If that process were to start by a federal to state possession, we need to be very careful on state oversight and management, so that all people can enjoy our state land both in and out of state residents.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Water is one of Wyoming’s most important natural resources, we need to keep what little of that resource we have in Wyoming and not out of state. By doing things to keep our water in Wyoming for all to use is very important to me.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Wyoming is energy and Wyoming is an energy state, a good share of our states revenues are created by the energy industry. I do not feel energy based companies have the best interests of wildlife management in mind. A win, win example of energy companies working with wildlife is strip mining coal, after coal is mined many of those reclaimed areas have a higher wildlife count and better habitat than before the above ground land was touched. I believe that energy based businesses need to work directly with Wyoming Game and Fish employees to make sure that all lands are managed properly to conserve our states hunting and fishing industry. As you can see I believe that Wyoming can create great jobs and we need to consider hunting and fishing a true industry in our state.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“We have an incredible natural resource with wildlife in Wyoming, it needs to be protected and conserved properly. The WYGFD needs to increase its scope and breadth with as little oversight as possible by non hunting and fishing legislators. I think a properly managed WYGFD that was completely funded would end up with more jobs and a great wildlife industry for everyone to enjoy, it is also a way to help diversify our economy without spending more money on economic development. A good comparison of my line of thinking on this very important issue is like having a municipal golf course with no golfers on the city council, city managers office or mayor. I think that golf course would suffer in budget decisions.”

RYAN WRIGHT

SENATE DISTRICT 05

EMAIL: Ryan@wrightforwyoming.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“The costs associated with transferring federal land to the state is a main concern. If we are required to sell some state owned land to finance the transfer we jeopardize losing a state resource and future generations enjoyment of the land.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Water storage projects should be considered using a cost/benefit analysis for the tax payers. ”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Protecting animal migration paths are important in considering land development.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“The state has a vested interest in managing wildlife. ”

FRED EMERICH

SENATE DISTRICT 05

EMAIL: Fred.Emerich@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“There are problems with the Federal Management, but with good dialog these problems can be mitigated.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I support the Governor’s 10 in 10. The costs must be balanced with the results, but with budget shortfalls we must examine each project carefully.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I think G&F working with developers and energy can mitigate corridor encroachment.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“The G&F just came off the general fund. I would like to see how budgeting will work in the next year or so.”

STEPHAN PAPPAS

SENATE DISTRICT 07

EMAIL: stephan@pappasforwy.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I oppose taking possession of federal land. Wyoming does not have the resources to manage those lands, and I fear that we may do something rash when we come to that realization. There may be areas where state control might be expanded, if and where it make sense, and if we can afford it. I am not inclined to change the status quo.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Water is important to Wyoming, and we need to approach its use and conservation seriously, but in our current budget crisis, balancing the need to fund education and economic development places a burden on how much resources we can devote to water projects. There is a delicate balancing act between all the needs of the State, and not everyone or every sector will be happy about the portion they get. We will be successful if we meet at least some of everyone’s needs, but that may mean everyone may be unhappy to a degree. I just hope we are able to keep it equitable.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I believe the State should have a say in these issues, but compromise and consensus must occur so that we do not unduly affect either mineral production or wildlife management. It is a give and take. Both are important to Wyoming and need to exist in symbiosis.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“As a life time Wyomingite, and avid fisherman, I know how important it is to have a strong Game and Fish Department. I have supported weening the department off of General Funds, just like we are doing with other departments. Wyoming citizens have chosen not to increase personal taxation, and with looming deficits, the budget can only be balanced with either economic growth or budget cuts, or both. Until the citizenry is willing to reach into their pockets, solutions like weening the G&F off of the General Fund is the only logical path, as I do not want to see cuts to the department.”

LARRY HICKS

SENATE DISTRICT 11

EMAIL: lhickshunts@yahoo.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“The likelihood that any whole sale transfer of federal lands to state ownership is so remote that I believe this is mostly a none issue. If this is an important issue to WYHAA why did the organization not oppose the transfers of hundreds of thousands of acres of BLM lands to special interest by the Obama Administration?”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Your question is both false and misleading. First the legislature did not strip $80 million for the West Battle Project. The original appropriation was for $40 million and the legislature reduced that to $4.7 million. All of the storage projects have a fisheries and recreational component including the West Fork project to them that you did not mention. In addition, it not just irrigation, it is economic development for agricultural industry that helps keep these lands from being sold off and developed for other purposes which then in turn fragments habitat, block migration corridors and reduce availably to crucial winter ranges. Its hard to fathom why on one hand you promote the protection of big game migration corridors but where those corridors cross private agricultural lands you are willing to withhold of stop water projects that would assist these land owners economically in order to maintain those lands in their current state that protects those migration corridors and crucial winter ranges. The University of Wyoming’s Open Spaces publications have done an excellent job identifying the numbers of big game that winter on crucial winter ranges in WY and the numbers are substantial.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“They should have a strong say but not veto power.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Be careful what you ask for. Currently G&F budget is not under the over site of the WY legislature. If they go onto the general fund or receive significant general fund appropriation it would result in the G&F losing the discretionary ability to manage their own budget. ”

LEE ANN STEPHENSON

SENATE DISTRICT 11

EMAIL: LeeAnnSenateD11@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Tourism is the #2 industry in Wyoming, and access to public lands is one of the most important components of the industry. I, along with my husband, own a campground and know first hand how important access is for our guests and our hunters. I will work to keep public lands in public hands.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I have followed this particular issue closely as it is in my back yard, so to speak. Damming the West Fork of Battle would also change forever a beautiful and very steep canyon. Very few irrigators would be served by this proposed dam, with some of the benefit going to Colorado fields, with no current financial obligation by that state. Way too little irrigators will benefit from the added water for the cost. I feel we need a better long term water study on the use of High Savery as this new proposal is to supplement the late irrigation water from the Little Snake. It appears High Savery has been able to meet this need.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“New technologies in energy production should make it easier for production to avoid critical migration routes.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I would like to look at other creative funding sources for Wyoming Game and Fish and not soley rely on general fund appropriations. Taking some of the reliance on general funds hopefully would lessen the politics that get involved with management of our wildlife. Management should be heavily based on scientific evidence and not politics.”

TOM JAMES

SENATE DISTRICT 13

EMAIL: james.t82901@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I support the idea of Wyoming having control of the land when we can afford the the maintenance and with the stipulation that it can never be sold.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Water is a high priority, but we must come up with a plan that will work and is within our budget.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“We need to find a balance between the energy companies and the Wyoming people, this is their home the energy companies just rent a spot. I feel this should be on a ballot so the people can have a voice in this particular issue.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Residents should help with the funding of WYGFD through purchase of licenses at a reasonable price. The remainder of the funding can come from other sources.”

TED L. BARNEY

SENATE DISTRICT 13

EMAIL: ted.barney@tedbarney.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I have hunted and fished in Wyoming all my life and I don’t think the State needs to manage federal lands.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I look at these as pet projects for small special interest groups.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Company policies ($$$) are why we need OSHA, MSHA, and the EPA.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Wyoming’s wildlife is what makes Wyoming, Wyoming.”

JOHN HASTERT

SENATE DISTRICT 13

EMAIL: jhastert2@wyoming.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I support “public lands in public hands” transferring to the state is a bad idea. we need to protect these land for public access”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“we need responsible water use in Wyoming, and don’t support taxpayer resources to support just a handful of users.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I believe in energy development in Wyoming, but there are areas that need protected. A good balance between energy and wildlife is needed”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“The most misunderstood agency. The Wyoming Game & Fish is charged with managing ALL Wyoming wildlife and yet only a very few generate resources the G&F can use to sustain their operation. G&F needs proper funding to appropriately manage all wildlife”

WENDY SCHULER

SENATE DISTRICT 15

EMAIL: wdschuler13@hotmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I don’t think the state has the resources to manage our public lands effectively.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Water storage must be extremely necessary or it’s not worth the expenditure.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I’m extremely concerned about the mule deer population.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I would need to see a breakdown of the budget before making a decision.”

JEFFREY SIMS

SENATE DISTRICT 15

EMAIL: simsshaun@yahoo.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“”There are pros and cons on both sides of this issue. If the state were to gain control of the federal lands to manage without change to the regulations that are in place now the management would have to stay the same except the stated would take on a large financial burden that it cannot afford.
If the state did gain control of the lands, and regulations were changed, there would need to be safeguards in place so that sales or transfer of public land would benefit public land use as a whole.
A possible benefit that local control may have is being able to get habitat and range improvements done in a timely manner.””

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“These projects that are being proposed have other benefits beyond irrigation. Late season flows for fish habitat, water sources for municipalities and industry, and to secure our water resources for generations to come. In the Colorado River Basin if Wyoming does nothing there is pressure to use that water down stream which is of no benefit to Wyoming and our citizens.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“There are science based and proven mitigation measures that can keep these migration routes open and still allow for energy development.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I believe the state does have a responsibility to manage these species but i also would contend that the federal government has an equal if not greater responsibility to help the state financially to manage at risk species and should support the state in their management activities.”

JARAUN DENNIS 

SENATE DISTRICT 15

EMAIL: jaraun@mac.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I feel that given our current economic issues that if given those lands the state would sell in an effort to make money and I strongly oppose that.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Water is important for all residence to the state of Wyoming at the same time so is agriculture but we need to find different ways to support those who need it later in the season.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“At this time I would like to learn more about this issue and make sure that my position would reflect a majority of the Uinta County constituents.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“At this time I would like to learn more about this issue and make sure that my position would reflect a majority of the Uinta County constituents.”

R. RAY PETERSON

SENATE DISTRICT 19

EMAIL: ray@officeshopinc.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“This effort to regain control of our own lands would be a long, phased in program that would work at maintaining public access on the majority of public lands. I would insist that a majority of these public lands would remain public, but a small percentage of selected acres that have water available could be developed for ag use. I remain convinced that the state of Wyoming could do a much better job of managing our forests, lands, wildlife, water and minerals, than our federal partners. I’ve always asked this question, what makes it right to allow other U.S. citizens to control our state while I have no say in what they do in their state? What makes it right to require us in Wyoming to have to get any improvement to our lands or wildlife, approved by an act of congress? I would think that we in Wyoming should finally wake up and insist that we be treated like any other fellow citizen in most other states where they control their own destiny. The fear that state government would sell off all public lands is simply false. Everyone in our state loves public access. We are fully capable of managing our own decisions of land use. Wyoming control, Wyoming decisions and Wyoming management would produce healthier forests, better managed public lands, better managed wildlife and a healthier economy. ”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“These projects are expensive, yet we must continue to develop our storage capacities. This will have to be done over a long period of time and of what we can afford. If we don’t make these efforts, other states where development is happening, will continue to demand more water, leaving us at the mercy of only what is left. It is a case of “if we don’t use it, we will lose it.” Once these allocations are made, we will never get them back.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“Again, a Wyoming solution is what we need. Fish and game working with industry to insure that wildlife is protected and that the impact is at a minimum.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“We need to ensure that the Game and fish budget is consistent and funded to allow them to do their jobs. Appropriate licensing fees, the trust fund, donations, keeping department overhead and management costs low with supplemental funding from the legislature should provide us with enough revenue to take care of our wildlife management costs.”

REYNOLDS KOST

SENATE DISTRICT 19

EMAIL: kostfmly@tritel.net

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I am opposed at this time to the state taking anymore burden on. We have enough challenges to our funding of what we have.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“This is a very important issue in our state but at this time I am not knowledgeable of the facts on both sides so until I have more data and information I have to stay in the middle. I do believe agriculture is an important part of our state but at the same time so is our budget and keeping things in perspective so at this time more information will need to be researched by me before taking a stand either way. ”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Wyoming Game and Fish should have a strong say in migration and energy but at the same time action groups focused on only one side of a situation must be removed from controlling our states activities and functions. There should and can be room for both the energy companies and the migration but there must be communication and well developed plans.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“This is an important issue in our state but so is the budget. I will not say I would or would not be in favor of money allocated to this until I could see the whole picture of the budget and what the funding would create. The cost of licenses has increased dramatically and will soon only be a sport for the rich if we are not careful. These activities are great for our citizens and especially for our youth and we must find ways to keep prices for the privileges reasonable.”

DAVID CLARENDON

SENATE DISTRICT 21

EMAIL: dtclarendon@hotmail.com

 

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I was the non-lessee representative on former Gov. Mike Sullivan’s first blue ribbon task force studying the sale of state lands in 1996. I caste one of two votes opposing the privatization of state lands and was pilloried by the agricultural and oil and gas industries for that vote. Consequently, the Governor commissioned a second committee to come with the acceptable answer. So I am highly aware of this issue. I have always said that we view open space today the way our ancestors viewed the buffalo 150 years ago- limitless. But in my life I have seen a great diminution of open space and the accompanying access. As a land owner and an outfitter I always allow meat hunters and doe hunters free access foot or horseback when I can fit them in. And that was not always the case for me as a hungry kid. Now I see some public land lessees charging exorbitant fees to cross private to access the public. But them’s the rules! Sometimes the public is its own worst enemy. Most lately, I co-chaired the Fortification Creek public land initiative and I am immensely proud of the fact that we brought all sides together in a consensus, which, while not perfect, was acceptable to just about everybody locally. The Backcountry Hunters and Anglers were helpful in this effort. We were the one shining star in a sky full of failures. Sorry if this is too long but I am pretty passionate about public access, particularly for the younger generation.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I spend a good portion of the summer irrigating, which puts my masters degree from UW in hydrology to good use, so once again, I am highly aware of the economics of storing water to grow fodder. I was a snow surveyor for about 20 years. I also sit on several irrigation boards and districts. There are no economically feasible dam sites left in Wyoming, however, there are some other administrative options for providing water such as water banking and water exchanges. But in the long run, conservation and public awareness are the solution.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“I know Emmaline Oslind and her incredible ground-breaking work on the antelope migration out of Jackson Hole. I have hunters who say just sell me 40 acres so I can have a getaway in Wyoming, which I view as a great lead in to a discussion and explanation of habitat fragmentation. I have been fortunate enough to travel around the world, and you are indeed right. We have the last great temperate game populations left in the world. Ever since Gov. Jim Geringer started speaking with “one voice”, the G+F has pandered to the O+G industry, which pays most of its bills. O+G development can co-exist with a healthy environment, but it will cost a little more, something they don’t seem inclined to accept.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“G+F funding was set up to be a-political, but that has not always been the case. While I genuinely like and appreciate the local G+F employees here, I find the bureaucracy has become cumbersome and intransigent. Case in point, from my perspective as a landowner, depredation hunts on elk and whitetail deer that decimate my hay. G+F fully admits their rules are overly complex, yet does nothing to simplify them, alienating both landowners and hunters. I would like to take the politics and bureaucracy out of what should be scientific decisions. Thank you for your appreciation of our wonderful state!”

HOLLIS HACKMAN

SENATE DISTRICT 21

EMAIL: hollishackman@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Hunting and fishing in Wyoming is part of our heritage. To remove public access is an affront to my Wyoming values.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Projects of this nature must be available to the public, including hunting and fishing access. ”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Game migration corridors must take precedence energy development. If both can be accommodated, I would give that consideration. ”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“More than just hunters and anglers appreciate our abundant wildlife. General fund dollars must be available to support our old life for the benefit and enjoyment of all.”

BO BITEMAN

SENATE DISTRICT 21

EMAIL: bobiteman@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“I support the state having more of a say when it comes to management of the federal lands within our border. I do not support a transfer of national forests, national parks, national monuments, wilderness areas, etc. If a transfer were to ever be a possibility, I would like to see Wyoming get our severed mineral rights back from the federal government. That would be something I could get behind. Those severed mineral rights are located under private lands.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“Water is critical for our state, and I support common sense projects that offer a good return on investment for our taxpayers.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I support protecting critical wildlife migration corridors. There needs to be collaboration and cooperation between all interested parties. I believe that we can have responsible energy development and wildlife protections; it is not an “either/or” issue. I would strongly oppose banning all oil and gas leasing within those corridors. There can be stipulations within the leases that do not allow for disturbances during the migration period for example. ”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I did not support taking the WYGFD out of the general fund because I feel it is our duty as the Wyoming Legislature to budget and appropriate funds and have adequate oversight of every state agency. My fear was that the WYGFD would then be able to raise hunting and fishing license fees without our approval. I don’t want poor people priced out of being able to afford hunting and fishing. ”

SERGIO MALDONADO

SENATE DISTRICT 25

EMAIL: arapaho17mile@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Being very pragmatic, if the 2016 study revealed no substantial gains in revenue production one then has to question “why force the issue.” If state funds are at an all time low, how does the state intend to fund? I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control federal land.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“There is no question that water is Wyoming’s next gold and the same holds true for both the Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone tribes. Water storage is costly but must be addressed within a long term perspective inclusive of funding availability. Agriculture is important to not only Wyoming but to the nation yet I am pulled in the direction of conservation, cost benefit and what is good use of taxpayer money? This particular issue is important . . . . .”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“”Wyoming’s incredible game populations” and all the political verbiage should extend beyond oil and gas leases within corridors. Protecting big game herds is far more important for our populations, our future and the development of energy. The threats are corporate America and their myopic take on the value of the environment inclusive of game. The Wyoming Game and Fish managers and all those with a level of expertise must have a very “strong say in all aspects related to . . . development in migration corridors and winter ranges.””

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I support WYGFD and their effort to sustain game viability, proactive conservation efforts. An acceptable level of funding must be made available to WYGFD. I do have one concern and that is related to the delisting of the grizzly bear. The Northern Arapaho Elders Society maintain that the Fish and Wildlife Service failed to acknowledge the sovereignty of the Northern Arapaho tribe and their opposition to the Grizzly Bear delisting. But that is another question . . .”

Governor

FOSTER FRIESS

GOVERNOR

EMAIL: jspina@fosterfriess.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“It is in our interest as Wyoming citizens to keep federal lands under federal control. The risk of forest fires is very real, and it’s better to have the federal government pick up those maintenance expenses than Wyoming taxpayers having to foot the bill, but Wyoming also needs to negotiate better access to these lands to bolster our key economic drivers.

Fortunately, God Blessed us with such bountiful land that we can have it all. Certain areas should be restricted from mineral extraction and preserved if they are pristine hunting areas or scenic areas, but we can also open up new areas for mineral developments that will help boost our economy as we continue to diversify our tax base.

Having the federal government control and own the lands, but allowing for greater access to use them is similar to being able to borrow our brother-in-law’s cabin for a two-week vacation, but if it needs a new roof, that’s his problem.

I like what Governor Butch Otter of Idaho did when he negotiated the designation of Bogus Basin as a landscape treatment area in which private companies could bid on contracts to remove the beetle kill in the area, and the state of Idaho then splits with the federal government the proceeds from that management. No change in ownership of the land takes place.

I also strongly support The Federal Land Freedom Act that would allow states to prove they have the capabilities to oversee oil and gas permitting, leasing and production on available federal land brought to the floor of Congress last year by Rep. Liz Cheney.

The contacts I have built by meeting with a dozen governors quarterly and with cabinet officers as a result of my support of conservative Republican causes could be harnessed to influence these decisions.

What are your thoughts about utility-scale renewable energy development (e.g. wind and solar) in Wyoming? What role, if any, should the State of Wyoming play in the regulation of these activities?

The state cannot afford to hand out subsidies of any kind to any industry. That being said, with some of the best wind and solar potential in the country we cannot turn a blind eye to this industry.

“We must find a fair and equitable way to tax wind and solar companies then get government out the way and allow the free market to determine their fate.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“The American Society of Civil Engineers estimated a $409.9 million need for drinking water infrastructure in Wyoming by the year 2020, a $91 million need in wastewater needs and identified 87 dams considered to be a high-hazard potential.

Thankfully Wyoming has a representative in Washington D.C. like John Barrasso, who introduced and garnered bipartisan support for America’s Water Infrastructure Act of 2018. By earmarking federal funding for additional water storage, allowing for improved irrigation and sterilization, increased flood protection, and upgrading old water systems, we can ensure Wyoming has clean water for generations to come.

This is exactly the type of federal aid we need in Wyoming, but we cannot rely entirely on the feds and must continue to fund infrastructure updates as well as vigilantly enforce regulations to protect our water supply as we try to expand mineral developments throughout the state. We cannot afford even the possibility of contaminating another community’s water system like in Pavillion, Wyoming.

While the state can help provide scientific expertise and funding, I believe local control is always the best policy. Here in Jackson the contamination of Fish Creek and Brooks Lake and the constant flooding of Flat Creek as has been closely monitored and managed by local groups like the Teton Conservation District and various water improvement districts. Local infrastructure upgrades have also been met by the likes of over a dozen water and sewer districts like the Aspen-Pines Water and Sewer District.

These special districts have been very successful in Jackson and should be used more throughout the state, but they need help from the state government. We cannot short change our water system like they did in Flint Michigan.

Grants like the $944,700 appropriation the legislature approved this year for The Melody Ranch Water Improvement and Service District to update the entire subdivision’s water transmission lines and construct a new well, are critical to supplement federal funding and maintain Wyoming’s high quality water service.

In addition, we must continue to fund the Department of Environmental Quality’s projects to preserve the nearly 70 streams and rivers that are considered impaired and continue to monitor those reaching unsafe levels of E. coli is just as critical.

“My plan to diversify the state by bringing existing Wyoming companies to new national and international markets, attracting new tech and manufacturing businesses and enhancing the state’s investment portfolio as we continue to find efficiencies in budgets will stabilize our the state’s financial position and provide meaningful funding for these critical water projects.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Wyoming’s abundant wildlife is absolutely a public resource and as such, it is the state government’s responsibility to manage them. I thought Governor Mead did a good job of putting together a diverse group of stakeholders to develop a balanced plan for managing the greater sage grouse to prevent the birds from being added to the endangered species list. But, I also support Secretary Zinke’s decision to open allow for more mineral exploration within their habitat areas.

My experience in both politics and business has expertly prepared me for navigating these types of negotiations if elected Governor. I have already exchanged texts with Secretary Zinke and by securing more state control over how our lands are used we can unleash our legacy industries while preserving pristine wilderness areas.

Allowing our passionate and experienced managers balance mineral developments with the population we can avoid any need for privatization.

How do you believe the state should address the flaring, venting, and mechanical leakage of natural gas (methane) in oil and gas fields? Please elaborate on any regulatory, revenue, and/or public health concerns that you consider relevant.

While we must work with our leaders in the Natural Gas industry to ensure a little leakage as possible, natural gas is cleaner burning than other fossil fuels with the combustion of natural gas producing negligible amounts of sulfur, mercury, and particulates. Though Burning natural gas does produce nitrogen oxides (NOx), which are precursors to smog, it does so at lower levels than gasoline and diesel used for motor vehicles.

With such immense natural gas reserves in Wyoming and the price of the commodity steadily climbing, we must take advantage of this opportunity and work with the federal government to deregulate the industry and streamline the permitting process by allowing local BLM managers to oversee the process.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I view our public lands and wildlife corridors as a piece of our public infrastructure.

The public lands that support Wyoming diverse wildlife are what make our state such a special to live, work and raise a family. Maintaining key wildlife corridors are critical to preserving the regional ecosystems we all value as not only a quality of life driver but also as a driver of sales tax revenue.

While we must work to shrink the size of the budget and reduce wasteful spending, funding programs like the Game and Fish’s habitat priority program area the right use for taxpayer dollars.”

BILL DAHLIN

GOVERNOR

EMAIL: contact@dahlinforgovernor.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Article 4 section 3 clause 2 of the constitution identifies reasoning for not transferring. I have never camped overnight on state land. Not only do I support public lands in public hands, the state lands need to have better access.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“While water is important and the need to capture it for multiple use, we need to have good economic reasoning to do it.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“I believe the two sides can find compromise in order to protect our wildlife and extract energy. An example would be to prevent operations during time of migration if in their path.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Funding is always the issue. This highlights the need to actually diversify our economy. That being said, I believe if funded properly, the WYGFD could bring in more revenue through expanded opportunities for sportsman.”

KENNETH CASSNER

GOVERNOR

EMAIL: Kcss@union-tel.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“”Representation is through the legislator, you elect them I speak for the people who voted for them… The governor is the spokesmen for the people not the legislator… In other words the people have the last say…””

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Again what do the people want through their legislators!”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“You elect these people and when it gets to my desk the people will speak…”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“What a survey what make you think the governor can do what you ask, the people speak through him nothing more, read the meaning of Representation…”

SAM GALEOTOS

GOVERNOR

EMAIL: sam@samforgovernor.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Growing up in Wyoming, I was raised to love public lands and cherish my access and time on public lands. Having said that, I do not support the transfer of federal lands to the state of Wyoming. As Governor, I will work to make sure that Wyoming has the most control possible of the public lands within our state to promote the full use and enjoyment of those lands for all Wyoming citizens. I will work cooperatively with the Trump Administration to restore as much decision-making ability to the State of Wyoming as is possible using a strict multi-use model. This means more of the decisions on how Wyoming’s lands are managed are made right here – in Wyoming, by the people of Wyoming.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Water is Wyoming’s most important natural resources and water storage is a critical issue. We have hundreds of thousands of acre feet of water we are not utilizing but is allocated to us for use. Wyoming has 5 major river heads and we have an abundance of water. I support Governor Mead’s 10 in 10 project. As Governor Mead has said, “These projects are sponsored by local entities, support local beneficial uses, and provide flexibility for future uses of stored water.””

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I’m supportive of Governor Mead’s position and direction in this area. Wyoming has been balancing this issue and it is my belief we will continue to do so. Protecting big game migration is important but so is energy production and the subsequent jobs that sustain families all around Wyoming. Wyoming has and will continue to balance these two important issues to ensure big game migration continues as does energy production.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“As we continue to see a structural deficit in the state, pressure is being put on all state agencies, our education system and health care. Our most vulnerable citizens are put at risk by our continued budget issues. It is my goal to work to eliminate the structural deficit. Until that happens no other pressure should be placed up the general fund. While the issues of wildlife management are important, state agencies will need to live within their budgets until this crisis is solved.”

MARK GORDON

GOVERNOR

EMAIL: mark@gordonforwyoming.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“As a lifelong sportsman, maintaining and improving public access and multiple-use while protecting private property rights is critical. My main priority is keeping public lands in public hands, so I oppose large scale federal transfers. However, I am in favor of efforts to allow for more state control over federal land management and ensuring local stakeholders have a voice in the process. Wyoming cannot afford to lose out on the rapidly expanding outdoor recreation industry by losing important public access to our lands, waters and scenic vistas. ”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“”Wyoming’s water is among our most precious resource and I will fight to protect it. As a rancher, I understand it’s a critical component of our agricultural production. Water rightfully belongs to the state and we must ensure state management at every turn. As Governor, I will fight rules such as Waters of the United States (WOTUS) that would expand federal authority over both surface and underground water quality. I will defend Wyoming’s rights under our interstate compacts.

I share concerns over the scope and cost of some storage projects. As with most issues, we must strike an appropriate balance in meeting production needs, protecting our resources and being responsible stewards of taxpayer dollars. “”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Responsible energy development and protecting Wyoming open spaces and wildlife are not mutually exclusive. There are no greater stewards of our land than Wyoming people. Having worked in the oil and gas industry, I understand how we strike an appropriate balance in harnessing our vast natural resources while ensuring sensitive wildlife corridors are protected.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“It’s important that we find alternative funding for wildlife management to broaden the base contributing to conserving our incredible wildlife resource. Sportsmen and sportswoman shouldn’t bear the entire cost, especially for species not hunted, but there are alternatives to the general fund including Recovering America’s Wildlife Act. (RAWA).”

MARY THRONE

GOVERNOR

EMAIL: info@maryforwyoming.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Public lands should remain in public hands. Period.

I unequivocally oppose transferring federal lands to the state. These attempts are a prelude to privatizing our public lands. Even if this were not the case, Wyoming almost certainly could not afford to manage the federal lands. It costs hundreds of millions of dollars per year—money that Wyoming simply doesn’t have available in its current budget. To say nothing of the risk that a future legislature might try to solve their budget shortfalls by selling off public lands.

The next governor will need to be a strong advocate to ensure that federal land management decisions protect all of Wyoming’s interests. Our public lands offer world class places to hunt, fish, hike, wildlife and bird watch, rock climb, mountain bike and more. We attract visitors from all over the world because of the breadth and diversity of our outdoor recreation opportunities. These lands are our heritage and I will always fight to protect our greatest treasures.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I agreed with the legislature’s decision on West Battle Reservoir. However, neither statement really captures my views on the topic and I appreciate the opportunity to explain. Water projects are expensive and as any appropriation for any purpose, must be evaluated for the overall public benefit. In order to obtain Army Corps of Engineer Permits for any large storage project, they must demonstrate multiple use. Recreation is always one of the uses.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Maintaining migration corridors is critical to ensuring the health of our big game herds. I’m proud of the work that has been done to ensure those corridors remain intact and that we can improve connectivity when possible. As a legislator, I advocated for more funding for the Wildlife and Natural Resource Trust Fund, with the support of the energy industry. I also defended against repeated challenges to the work of the Wildlife Trust and the conservation easements supported by the fund. These easements have been essential to protecting habitat across the state. As Governor, I would work with all stakeholders and relevant state and federal agencies to protect migration corridors. Wyoming must continue to rely on science to guide our conservation decisions and as Governor I would do so by supporting needed research and management funding of the Wyoming Game and Fish.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“As a Wyoming Legislator I was proud to support funding for conservation and would continue to do so as Governor. We need to provide stable and adequate funding for the WYGFD. Investing in our wildlife is a good investment in our economy and our outdoor heritage. I would also advocate for Congress to pass the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act to help provide much needed, dedicated funding to ensure WYGFD can implement the state wildlife action plans. General Fund appropriations are not stable and leave the agency vulnerable to the whims of the legislature. I supported GF appropriations in the past due to the agency’s expanding responsibilities associated with endangered species management and will do so in the future, as necessary.”

TAYLOR HAYNES

GOVERNOR

EMAIL: Taylor@haynesforwyoming.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“The study is flawed. We will enjoy at least $1billion in additional income and exponentially greater access to our lands.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 1

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“Water is one of our most important natural resources. We must control all that is ours. ”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“There must be direct involvement from the Governors office to strike the necessary balance between wildlife management and development.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“”Healthy specie populations are the best measure of overall health of the land.
Thus we must give the needed attention (funding) to this effort.””

Other Statewide Offices

JEFF DOCKTER

STATE AUDITOR

EMAIL: info@dockterforauditor.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I am not running for the Legislature, though if asked to testify as State Auditor, I would cite that I am opposed to efforts to take possession or control of federal land.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I am not running for the Legislature, though if asked to testify as State Auditor, I would say that in my opinion, Wyoming needs to be proactive in planning and creating water storage capacity to support a growing population.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I am not running for the Legislature, though if asked to testify as State Auditor, I would say that in order to keep Wyoming wild, game and fish experts should have a role in the evaluation and decision making process when it comes to energy exploration or drilling in migration corridors and winter ranges.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I am not running for the Legislature, though if asked to testify as State Auditor, I would say that I am supportive of general fund dollars to promote conservation efforts.”

JAMES BYRD

SECRETARY OF STATE

EMAIL: james@jameswbyrd4wysos.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Wyoming’s #1 signature trait is it’s access to public lands. Not ever going to support anything to change that.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Water project should be design to service the Wyoming residents (hunters, anglers, ranchers, farmers) first.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“The federal government really does not have an understanding of game migration. Therefore, it is critical that the states take the lead with science based information to figure out the best practices.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“Proper wildlife management is key to healthy and productive game for the future. The WGF should be fully funded to execute its mission in the state.”

CURT MEIER

STATE TREASURER

EMAIL: meier4me@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Wyoming and it’s citizens need to have increased standing ( seats at the table ) without the federal government having absolute veto power on issues that effect Wyoming. Access and easements should be controlled closer to and by the people who are most impacted by the decisions be it hunters and fishermen or other multiple use beneficiaries.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

“Water for every use in our head water state is important to put to beneficial use, it is only going to get more and more costly the longer we wait. These costs seem high but when compared to what Colorado and the lower basin states are willing to pay for water like California, Nevada or Arizona they are reasonable.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

” The Wyoming Wildlife trust fund spends millions on corridors and I will continue to support those efforts.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“I will expertly invest the state funds to increase the general funds available. I would request that your organization lobby legislators to repeal the law which statutorily removes 50% of the general fund income derived from the Permanent Mineral Trust fund before it can be appropriated for anything through the standard process including your priorities. Please help me with budget transparency. They are hiding money right under your nose. I’ll help you find it.”

JILLIAN BALOW

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

EMAIL: jillian4supt2018@gmail.com

Public lands are a critical resource for hunters and anglers in Wyoming. In 2016, the Wyoming State Legislature commissioned a study weighing the pros and cons of transferring federal public lands to the state. The study revealed that Wyoming would not see any substantial gains in revenue production or additional sources of revenue from such a transfer, while the costs of managing these lands would be significant. Sportsmen around Wyoming are concerned that the quality of management would decline under state control and that the state might look to sell lands in the future to meet revenue targets. Hunters and anglers have vocally opposed any such transfer. What is your stance on this issue?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I support efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.
5 = I oppose efforts that would allow the state to take possession or control of federal land.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

“As a statewide elected official and member of the State Land Board of Commissioners (SLBC) I understand a primary responsibility is to maximize revenue on state-owned lands. Each decision on this board is unique and must be carefully and ethically juxtaposed with multiple use opportunities, including recreation/sports. I am increasingly concerned about using federal ownership of lands to stall development and restrict access. I advocate for multiple use and state guidance on federally owned lands. As a statewide official, I neither draft or vote on bills in the Wyoming Legislature.”

Governor Mead’s Water Strategy included the 10 in 10 initiative to streamline storage projects across the state. So far, no project has been completed. Storage projects are expensive and in Wyoming, typically built to provide supplemental irrigation to a few irrigators. Economics and permitting will continue to make new storage projects very difficult to implement. During the last legislative session, the legislature stripped $80 million from the proposed West Battle Reservoir because the cost/benefit analysis to Wyoming taxpayers did not make sense. Which statement best captures your thoughts about these storage projects?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Water storage projects are important for our state and a good use of taxpayer money.
5 = Providing late season water to a few irrigators is not worth the expense of most storage projects; there are better ways to conserve water and keep lands in agriculture.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 2

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“Water as a resource will become more of a priority in the future and the 10 in 10 plan is a proactive way to address the issue. As a statewide elected official I neither draft nor sponsor bills in the Wyoming Legislature.”

Protecting Wyoming’s incredible game populations requires allowing safe movement of animals between summer and winter ranges. Wyoming is home to some of the most impressive migrations in North America, including the longest recorded mule deer migration in the world, the Red Desert to Hoback migration. Development in these migration routes and in crucial winter range have been shown to impact these migrations, reducing access to critical habitat and depleting populations. Both Governor Mead and the Trump administration have made migration corridor protection a priority, but threats remain, including proposed oil and gas leases within corridors. How should Wyoming best balance its need to develop energy while protecting big game herds?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Energy companies know how to manage and reduce their impacts on wildlife; the state doesn’t need to regulate their activities.
5 = Wyoming Game and Fish managers should have a strong say in all aspects related to energy development in migration corridors and winter ranges.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 4

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 5

“We can continue to accomplish wildlife management AND economic development goals through strong leadership, careful decision making, and informed advocacy.”

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WYGFD) is responsible for managing and protecting over 800 species within the state. This includes the game species that support hunting and angling in our state but also the many non-game species that support Wyoming’s wildlife watching economy. The agency has identified more than 230 species in need of proactive conservation efforts, yet it is estimated that state wildlife agencies in the US only have five percent of the estimated funding they need to do their job. Today, hunters and anglers support the vast majority of the Game and Fish budget through the purchase of licenses. General fund appropriations have traditionally funded part of the Game and Fish budget, but these funds have been cut, leaving hunters and anglers to pick up the tab. Adequate funding for WYGFD is critical to maintaining the wildlife populations that benefit everyone in our state. Would you support appropriations from the general fund going to ensure that WYGFD can adequately manage our wildlife populations?

Scale of 1 – 5
1 = I do not believe that the general fund should be used to pay for WYGFD’s management of our wildlife resources.
5 = All residents have an interest in the management of our wildlife and I will work to ensure proper WYGFD funding levels through general fund appropriations.

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

How important is this issue for you?
Scale of 1 – 5
1 = Low Priority
5 = High Priority

CANDIDATE ANSWER: 3

“As a statewide elected official I neither draft, sponsor, or vote on bills in the Wyoming Legislature. That said, there is a balance between leveraging state funds and revenues for sportsmen/women.”

CANDIDATES WHO DID NOT RESPOND TO OUR QUESTIONNAIRE

Don’t see your candidate above? Check below to see if they chose not to respond to the hunting and angling community.

You should feel free to reach out to your candidates directly to ask their stances on the issues important to WYHAA and the sportsman’s community as a whole.

STATEWIDE CANDIDATES

  • GOVERNOR – Harriet Hageman – harriet@hagemanforgovernor.com

 

  • SECRETARY OF STATE – Ed Buchanan – edwardbuchanan@wyoming.com

 

  • STATE TREASURER – Leland Christensen – lelandchris59@gmail.com
  • STATE TREASURER – Ron Redo – ronredo4@gmail.com

 

  • STATE AUDITOR – Nathan Winters – winters4auditor@gmail.com
  • STATE AUDITOR – Kristi Racines – vote@kristiracines.com

WYOMING STATE SENATE


  • STATE SENATOR 01 – William Driskill – wyomingcowboy77@gmail.com
  • STATE SENATOR 01 – Lenard Seeley – lenardseeley@rtconnect.net
  • STATE SENATOR 03 – Cheri Steinmetz – steinmetzforsenate@gmail.com
  • STATE SENATOR 05 – Karen Hutchings – hutchingsforsenate@gmail.com
  • STATE SENATOR 05 – Ryan Wright – media@wrightforwyoming.com
  • STATE SENATOR 09 – Chris Rothfuss – rothfussforsenate@gmail.com
  • STATE SENATOR 11 – Lee Stephenson – springergrma@gmail.com
  • STATE SENATOR 15 – Paul Barnard O.D. – paul.barnard@wyoleg.gov
  • STATE SENATOR 15 – Eugene Joyce – etjoyce13@icloud.com
  • STATE SENATOR 17 – Katherine Mead – kate@meadforsenate.com
  • STATE SENATOR 17 – Michael Gierau – jeds@wyom.net
  • STATE SENATOR 21 – Dustin Looper – looper.dustin@yahoo.com
  • STATE SENATOR 23 – Jeff Raney – jeancaca@bresnan.net
  • STATE SENATOR 23 – William Wasserburger – jwasserburger@ccsd.k12.wy.us
  • STATE SENATOR 25 – James Case – ccase@wyoming.com
  • STATE SENATOR 27 – William Landen – bill.landen27@gmail.com
  • STATE SENATOR 29 – Drew Perkins – drewperkins08@gmail.com

WYOMING STATE HOUSE


  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 01 – Tyler Lindholm – jackpotcoast@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 02 – Hans Hunt – hhuntwyo88@yahoo.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 03 – Eric Barlow – barlow@vcn.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 05 – Roseanna Davison – roseannadavison@reagan.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 05 – Ruth Van Mark – rhvm59@outlook.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 05 – Joan Brinkley – rftrcj@yahoo.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 06 – Robert Clausen – aaron.clausen@yahoo.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 08 – Robert Nicholas – bob@proformtech.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 08 – Scott Guthrie – wyomitch@hotmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 09 – Landon Brown – landon.brown@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 10 – John Eklund – eklund4house@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 11 – Jared Olsen – jaredolsen1@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 12 – Constance Czarnecki – connieczarnecki@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 12 – Clarence Styvar – clstyvar@wyoming.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 14 – Daniel Furphy – electdfurphy@hotmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 14 – Narina Nunez – narinaluz@msn.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 15 – Donald Burkhart Jr. – burkhart@wyoming.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 16 – Barbara Allen – barbara.allen@jhsir.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 17 – Traci Ciepiela – tciepiela723@yahoo.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 17 – Joann Dayton – mdayto@msn.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 18 – Thomas Crank – tomc@crankco.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 18 – Scott Heiner – sdheiner9@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 19 – Karl Allred – karl.allred@prodigy.net
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 19 – Danny Eyre – daneyre@bvea.net
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 20 – Albert Sommers – albert@albertsommers.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 21 – Evan Simpson – esimpson@silverstar.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 22 – Martha Halverson – marti22@silverstar.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 23 – Andrew Schwartz – schwartzhd23@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 24 – Paul Fees – prfees@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 25 – Dan Laursen – dlaursen@tctwest.net
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 27 – Michael Greear – mgreear@wyosugar.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 28 – Timothy Morrison Mr – tjmorkin@tctwest.net
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 28 – John Winter – dwinter@wyoming.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 29 – Steven Cain – sacain2@yahoo.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 29 – Mark Kinner – wyokinner@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 30 – Clifford Jennings – mark5antique@yahoo.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 31 – Scott Clem – scottclem@live.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 33 – Jim Allen – diamond4@wyoming.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 33 – Andrea Clifford – aclifford72@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 34 – Timothy Salazar – timsalazar@yahoo.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 35 – Joseph Macguire – joemacguire762@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 37 – Gregory Flesvig – wyohd37@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 37 – Steven Harshman – harshmanforwyoming@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 38 – Tom Walters – tom.walters@reagan.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 40 – Richard Tass – rtass@wyoming.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 41 – William Henderson – bill4wyo@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 41 – Sean Castaneda – castaneda.campaign@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 42 – Theodore Blackburn – blackburnforhouse42@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 42 – Juliet Daniels – julietdanielshd42@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 43 – Daniel Zwonitzer – dzwonitzer@wyoming.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 44 – Paul Johnson – paul@johnsonforwyoming.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 44 – John Romero – bluemary2005@yahoo.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 44 – Sara Burlingame – burlingame4house@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 44 – Floyd Esquibel – fesquibel@wyo.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 45 – Roxie Hensley – roxiehensley@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 48 – Clark Stith – clarkstith@yahoo.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 49 – Garry Piiparinen – piiparin@msn.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 50 – Micheal Specht – specht@nemont.net
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 51 – Robert Griffin – wyomingtrue@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 52 – Harry Averett – purple55belair@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 52 – William Pownall – bpownall@wbaccess.net
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 53 – Roy Edwards – redwards@vcn.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 54 – Lloyd Larsen – lloydlarsen@wyoming.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 55 – David Miller – davidmiller@wyoming.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 56 – Kristan Gaddis Mr – johnadams1776usa@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 56 – Jerry Obermueller – jerryobermueller@hotmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 57 – Charles Gray – chuckgray@grayforhouse.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 57 – Jane Ifland – ifland4house@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 58 – Patrick Sweeney – patricksweeney616@gmail.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 59 – Bunky Loucks – bunky@wyomingofficeproducts.com
  • STATE REPRESENTATIVE 60 – John Freeman – freeman@wyoming.com